Category Archives for Living In Spain

Miercoles Swear Word Uncensored

The Miercoles Swear Word & Other Interesting Phrases

Miercoles is a popular Spanish swear word that can be used to express frustration or anger. It can be literally translated to mean ” Wednesday,” but is often used as an exclamation, similar to how we might use “damn” or “shit.” While it’s not the most offensive swear word out there, it’s still considered fairly taboo in polite company. So if you’re feeling angry or frustrated, let loose with a hearty miercoles! This is another of our Spanish Lingo posts, read on and enjoy.

Once you understand these words and phrases, you’ll soon pick up conversations in the bar over tapas or a wine. We have even heard the crash of cooking pots and expletives come from the kitchen as our local bar.

miercoles swear word

What Does Pucha Mean In Spanish Slang?

Pucha is another popular Spanish swear word that has a variety of meanings. It can be used to express frustration, anger, or disappointment, and is often used as an exclamation. Pucha can also be used to describe something that is unpleasant or disgusting. So if you’re feeling angry or frustrated, let loose with a hearty pucha!

And there you have it, a few popular Spanish swear words to help you express yourself when you’re feeling mad. Just remember, these words are best used in informal situations with friends or family members who won’t be offended by them. In formal situations, it’s best to stick to more standard Spanish swearing words like maldito(a) or cabrón(a).

What Does Feria Mean In Spanish Slang?

Feria is another popular Spanish swear word that has a variety of meanings. It can be used to express frustration, anger, or disappointment, and is often used as an exclamation. Feria can also be used to describe something that is unpleasant or disgusting. So if you’re feeling angry or frustrated, let loose with a hearty feria!

And there you have it, a few popular Spanish swear words to help you express yourself when you’re feeling mad. Just remember, these words are best used in informal situations with friends or family members who won’t be offended by them. In formal situations, it’s best to stick to more standard Spanish swearing words like maldito(a) or cabrón(a).

What Are The 3 Accent Rules In Spanish?

1. Every Spanish word has one correct pronunciation.

2. Pronunciations are not always intuitive, so it’s important to learn the rules.

3. There are three main accent rules in Spanish:

-Words that end in a vowel, -n, or -s are usually stressed on the second-to-last syllable (ex: camión, habitación, papá).

-Words that end in any other consonant are usually stressed on the last syllable (ex: perro, mesa, televisión).

-Words that have multiple syllables and end in a vowel other than -n or -s are usually stressed on the penultimate syllable (the one before the last) (ex: fotografía, comunidad, estadounidense).

Click To Order The Easy Spanish Phrase Book

Keep these accent rules in mind when you’re learning new Spanish words, and you’ll be able to pronounce them correctly. Just remember that there are always exceptions to the rule, so don’t get too bogged down in the details. If you can master these three accent rules, you’ll be well on your way to speaking Spanish like a native!

Easy Spanish Phrase Book

What Is The Accent In Spanish Called?

The accent in Spanish is called the tilde. It’s a diacritical mark that appears over certain letters to indicate that they should be pronounced differently than they would be without the accent. For example, the word “papá” (father) is accented on the letter “a,” which changes the pronunciation of the word. The accent can also change the meaning of a word, as in the case of “si” (yes) and “sí” (meaning “if” or “whether”). When in doubt, consult a dictionary or other resource to check the correct pronunciation of a word.

So there you have it, understanding Miercoles Swear Word  plus a brief overview of the Spanish accent and how it affects pronunciation. Just remember that there are always exceptions to the rule, so don’t get too bogged down in the details. If you can master the basic rules of Spanish pronunciation, you’ll be well on your way to speaking like a native!

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What Color Is Morado – More Spanish Lingo

Do you Know What Color Is Morado?

Today we are going to investigate what color is Morado and what are the correct ways to pronounce these words.

Morado is a color that is typically described as a purplish-brown or dark purple. It is a popular color in Latin America and is often associated with royalty and luxury. Morado can also be used to describe a deep, rich shade of purple. This is another word we can learn as we get to speak more Spanish and learn the language.

What Does The Spanish Word Morado Mean In English?

The Spanish word morado translated to English means purple. Morado is a color that can be described as a deep, rich purple or a purplish-brown. This color is often associated with royalty and luxury in Latin America. Morado is a beautiful, rich color that is perfect for adding a touch of elegance to any project.

what color is Morado

What Is The Correct Way To Say Purple In Spanish?

The word for purple in Spanish is morado. Morado can be used to describe a deep, rich shade of purple or a purplish-brown color. This word is often associated with royalty and luxury in Latin America. When referring to the color purple, it is important to use the adjective form of the word, morado.

What Is The Opposite Color Of Morado?

The opposite color of morado is amarillo. Amarillo is a yellowish-orange color that is the complementary color of purple on the color wheel. When pairing colors together, it is important to choose colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel to create a balanced and harmonious look. Purple and yellow are two colors that create a striking and eye-catching contrast.

What Colors Go Well With Morado?

Some colors that go well with morado are blanco (white), negro (black), azul (blue), gris (gray), and rojo (red). When choosing colors to pair together, it is important to consider the color wheel. Colors that are next to each other on the color wheel are typically complementary colors. This means that they create a striking and eye-catching contrast. However, too much of a contrast can be overwhelming. It is important to find a balance when pairing colors together.

In design, purple is often paired with neutrals like white, black, and gray. This creates a look that is both elegant and sophisticated. Purple is also often paired with blue. This combination is perfect for creating a calming and serene atmosphere. For a bolder look, purple can be paired with red. This combo is ideal for adding a pop of color to any space.

What Does Rosado Mean?

Rosado is the Spanish word for pink. Rosado can be used to describe a light or pale shade of pink. This color is often associated with femininity, romance, and sweetness. Rosado is a delicate and pretty color that can add a touch of elegance to any project.

How Do You Say Purple In Spanish For The Masculine Plural Form?

The masculine plural form of purple in Spanish is morados. Morados is the plural form of morado, which is the color purple. When referring to the color purple in the masculine plural form, it is important to use the adjective form of the word, morado.

How Do You Say Purple In Spanish For The Feminine Plural Form?

The feminine plural form of purple in Spanish is moradas. Moradas is the plural form of morada, which is the color purple. When referring to the color purple in the feminine plural form, it is important to use the adjective form of the word, morado.

What Is The Plural Form Of Morado In Spanish?

The plural form of morado in Spanish is morados. Morados is the masculine plural form of morado, which is the color purple. When referring to the color purple in the plural form, it is important to use the adjective form of the word, morado.

What Is The Feminine Form Of Morado In Spanish?

The feminine form of morado in Spanish is morada. Morada is the feminine singular form of morado, which is the color purple. When referring to the color purple in the feminine singular form, it is important to use the adjective form of the word, morado.

 

Conclusion.

So now we know the answer to what color is Morado, or if you wish to use Queens English and go with colour instead. Hope you are enjoying learning the basics of Spain and the language out here.

Hasta Luego!

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Empezar Conjugation The Present Tense & Command

Empezar Conjugation Explained

Living in Spain, sometimes you need to know more than asking for the bill or asking for tapas. We look at Empezar Conjugation and explain the contexts and uses.  As you can imagine, it is always handy to learn Spanish, especially living in more rural areas.
The Spanish verb ‘Empezar’ means ‘to start.’ Learn how to talk about your routines or the activities you want to start with its present tense, and how to give commands with its imperative.

Present Tense (Indicative Mood)

Empiezo I start, am starting, do start.

Empezamos we start, are starting, do start.

Empiezas you start, are starting; you do start.

Empieza he/she/it starts, is starting, does start.

Empezamos we start, are starting, do start.

Imperative Mood

Empieza! Start! Don’t start! Be careful when giving commands in Spanish since not all verbs have an imperative form. Some verbs have a present subjunctive form instead.

The Subjunctive Mood

While the present tense is used to discuss facts and generalizations, the subjunctive mood represents a conditional state of being. The following examples show how this works in English:

If I were rich…

If it were sunny out…

The subjunctive is quite common in Spanish. The following examples show how the subjunctive works in Spanish:

Si fueras listo…

If you were smart/clever …

¡Si hiciera buen tiempo! If it were nice weather!/If the weather were good!

If your partner is sick, you might want to say;   Te sientas un poco mejor. If you sit down, you feel better.

Note the use of “si” (if) and two verbs in the subjunctive mood: sentirse (to feel) and sentarse (to sit down).

 

No te sientes tan mal. Don’t feel so bad.

Si no fuese por ti, nunca lo habría hecho. If it weren’t for you, I never would have done it.

A great example of a day to day saying:

Proverb: Si la vida te da limones, haz limonada. If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

Meaning: Making the best of a difficult situation is better than crying about it or complaining about it. You can still find some good in a bad situation.

Si fueras tan listo… If you were so smart/clever …

If you were so smart/clever, you wouldn’t have forgotten to do your homework yesterday.

Si hiciera buen tiempo… If the weather were good …

If the weather were good, we wouldn’t have stayed indoors all day.

Te sientas un poco mejor. If you sit down, you feel better.

Si no fuese por ti, nunca lo habría hecho. If it weren’t for you, I never would have done it.

If it weren’t for you, I wouldn’t be an elementary school teacher today. Note the use of “si” (if) and two verbs in the subjunctive mood: sentirse (to feel) and sentarse (to sit down).

Examples of Empezar in the Present

To further help try to explain Empezar Conjugation  that is easy to understand. When using this verb in context, notice that there are two possible structures:

empezar + noun

empezar + a + infinitive

Te apetece empezar la cena.”

You feel like starting dinner.

Te apetece empezar a cenar. You feel like starting to eat dinner.

Para octubre todas las tiendas del centro están empezando a decorar sus escaparates.

For October, all the shops in the center are starting to decorate their windows.

Para octubre todas las tiendas del centro están empezando a poner adornos en sus escaparates. For October, all the shops in the center are starting to put decorations in their windows.

Carmen empieza a cocinar la cena mientras Daniel arregla el salón.

Carmen is starting to cook dinner while Daniel is arranging the living room.”

Carmen está empezando a cocinar la cena mientras Daniel está poniendo orden en el salón. Carmen is starting to cook dinner while Daniel is straightening up the living room.”

empezar a + infinitivo

La niña empieza a hablar cuando llega su mamá al cole.

The girl starts talking when her mom arrives at school.

La niña está empezando a hablar cuando llega su mamá al cole. The girl is starting to talk when her mom arrives at school.

empezar + noun + a + infinitivo

José y Óscar empiezan a trabajar en el invernadero.

José and Oscar are starting to work in the greenhouse.

Summing Up

 

Hopefully this is not too mind numbing and you now understand a little bit more about Empezar Conjugation and how to include this in your Spanish spoken requirements.

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A New Life in the Sun: Road Trip

 

Road Trip, Really?

Well, what a waste of space this is. Let’s give Fred something new to voice over while rehash all the old footage from the previous show.

Advertised as;

“Fred Sirieix takes us on a road trip around some of Europe’s most beautiful locations, meeting the Brits who have started new lives abroad. ”

NO.  Fred revisits a few folk from years back living in Europe.

Sounds like a promising new TV show?

Wrong. So, basically you visit the people who have already been featured on A New Life in the Sun. This is to the extent that they even use the same footage.

If you’re looking for something new, you’re in the wrong place. This is like Groundhog Day, based in Europe.

They might as well call this show A New Life in the Sun Revisited.  Oh wait, they have already done this too.

Well not to worry, there’s nothing like milking the same old footage and using a new voice over.

 

A New Life in the Sun: Where Are They Now?

Wait have we got yet another spin off?

Yes, it seems we have.

 

The question I ask is, do we care?

It’s fine to focus on a handful of people, but what about those who turned up with £5k to buy and revamp a bar and use the funds to pay rent on the accommodation for 12 months. You know who I mean, the failures. Those who ran out of money in week 3 of arriving.
The people who move out of their council house, sell all their possessions and move to open a hotel in France with their £9k cash budget.

Personally, as someone who doesn’t mind watching shows like a Place In The Sun or Life In The Sun, I loathe the fact this is pure rehashed footage used with a different voice over.

 

Do People Make A New Life In The Sun?

 

Some do but as I was reading this, a lot of this is so true;

1) Firstly and most importantly they have not done enough, if any, homework. They have absolutely no comprehension that for example someone who was, say, a dental receptionist in the UK is going to find it almost impossible to get the same job over here. Especially one who speaks no Spanish.

So,would you be happy if you rang, say, your dentist in Derby and found that the receptionist spoke only Spanish? So why should a dental receptionist expect to find work in a Spanish dental surgery? “Oh, well I could learn.” ¡No digo nada!

2) They have absolutely no comprehension of how expensive Spain is. I am sure I speak for many when I say that I find Spain is now only marginally less expensive than the UK for many things.

3) They make very little effort to learn any Spanish. A hobby-horse of mine so I won’t continue. NOWHERE in Spain is English universally spoken. Even in Benidorm, Torremolinos, Marbella or Torrevieja, Spanish is still the official language. NOT speaking Spanish will massively harm your chances of getting work. FACT.

4) They quite bluntly do not have a work appetite. Somehow they expect to work fewer hours for more money than they did in the UK.

5) Many were losers in the UK. Somehow they think if they come to Spain and do all the things they did wrong in the UK they will succeed. It’s pure folly to think if you do the same things you failed with before that you will get a different result if you continue to do them wrongly over here.

6) On the same track many are quitters. (Winners never quit and quitters never win.)

7) As they have done so little preparation re 1, 2 and 3 that when a problem happens they are not ready for it and struggle to overcome whatever the problem is.

Working In Spain?

 

Rule 1: Be honest with your level of experience and work history. Just because you have unblocked your toilet back in the UK, doesn’t mean while driving through France you should become a qualified plumber for when you arrive in Spain.
You think this is a joke? I have seen a truck driver who ‘became an electrician in Spain and had no idea what he was doing. He even installed an electric boiler and used UK plugs and adaptors.

Rule 2: Television is NOT real life. In real life people actually have to leave the bar and go to look for work. The prices on “A Place in the Sun” are pre the introduction of the euro….and it rains!

Rule 3: You will NOT make 60,000 euros a year as you come straight off the plane. You won’t be employed and you won’t get a contract until you earn both.

Rule 4: If you think the UK is tough, wait till you try Spain.

Be realistic in your plans.

Just because you have 2 weeks in Benidorm on the beach enjoying 28 degrees of sunshine, you need to realise living and working in the heat of summer, isn’t the same as your 2 weeks Jet 2 holiday.

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Karma For The BMW Driver

Karma Is A Laugh At Times

So here we are in the middle of Covid-19 Lockdown here in Spain. You aren’t meant to leave your own village/town without a really good reason. If you get stopped and you are not meant to be out, kiss €3000 goodbye when you get fined.

Brexit Aftermath

So thanks to Brexit, as a Brit you’re allowed to stay 90 days every 180 days unless you have a green card. So if you try to duck and dive, this would mean the next time you try to come back into Spain you run the risk of being turned back at arrivals in the airport. Not a pretty sight I imagine. This means that you can apply for Residencia which is basically the legal right to remain while you are living here.

As the Mrs had already got hers sorted I decided to apply for mine. Went to the local Police Station, with all my paperwork ( exactly the same as the Mrs had taken ) and a translator who did this day in, day out. Arrived and joined the masses waiting there, but we were second in the queue. That was the good point. Sadly the policeman had ventured away for his 10 am breakfast…..
Anyhow, by 11 am I’d been told NO. Seems he wouldn’t accept my health insurance policy which was online only, was online only and as such I had no ‘original’ certificate but I had printed out a copy as proof. Despite the translator explaining this 4 times, he was adamant it wasn’t proper and correct, so my application was rejected.

Next Steps

With a deadline of 31st December 2020 in place, I needed to get this sorted. Instead of a 20 minute drive into the nearest big town, I now had a 90 minute drive to Granada city to the foreigners’ office. I managed to get the first phase done thanks to a wonderful solicitor down there. Forms submitted, bank statements etc and then we went down for the appointment and fingerprints.
Advised that if all was good in 4 weeks I’d have my green card to collect. Back to the top of the page, as we are now in Covid lockdown I needed a letter from the solicitor to explain we had official business at the police station ( in case we got stopped ).

Driving down the motorway, sat there at 120 kmh ( 74 mph ) and I saw a warning sign advertising roadworks ahead. The next signs were for 100 kmh, then after that one for 80 kmh. The motorways in Spain generally are 2 lanes, so this was signposted we were going into single lane. In my mirror, there were 3 cars behind me and we were all deaccelerating accordingly, all except this gopping coloured BMW 3 Series that came tanking down the outside lane. Now on a normal day, I’d have accelerated and left him with 2 choices, drop in behind me or plow into the cones. As I dropped down a gear, I was aware of blue lights ahead on the other side of the motorway. There were 3 police cars and a van, all parked up in a roadblock. I braked a bit more to get down to the speed limit for the roadworks, just as the BMW idiot blasted past me.

Fat Lad Says Karma

Yes, you have guessed it. He then slammed on as we rounded the bend in the road and there we had 3 police cars traffic cones and several policemen stood in the road flagging cars down and sending them into the chicane cone system checkpoint. Like a good lad, I slowed right down, indicated and to my surprise was waved on. As were the next 4 cars behind us. The checkpoint was full with 8 vehicles all being inspected. This meant Mr. BMW was now parked at the back of this line of 8 cars and at a standstill.

Needless to say, had I not let him overtake, then I’d have been the last one to get pulled over. What makes me smile even more is the fact he was in such a hurry to blast past us as we were slowing down and keeping in the limit. No doubt he’ll have lost at least 4 or 5 minutes while he was being in the checkpoint. I have no idea if he was allowed to carry on his journey without a fine or was it double karma and he was travelling without good reason and was fined for doing so. Not sure if he just lost a few minutes of his journey or € 3000, but it seems that BMW drivers in Spain are the same as in the UK.

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Spanish Cooking Pots & Cookware

Essential Utensils and Cookware for Spanish Cooking

I live in Spain, and I’ve enthusiastically embraced the Mediterranean Diet and the principles of Spanish cookery. The Mediterranean Diet is known to be one of the healthiest eating plans around, and Spanish cookery relies on a few good quality ingredients, often cooked in one pot, which makes for simple cooking and not too much washing up.

Of course, you don’t have to live in Spain to cook Spanish, but wherever you are in the world, there are a few essential kitchen items which will make your Spanish cooking adventures simpler and give an authentic look to the finished dishes. Here’s my list of essential utensils and cookware for the Spanish kitchen.

Paella Pan

No Spanish kitchen is complete without a paella pan, which the Spanish call ‘paella,’ the same name as the main dish that is cooked in it. Paella pans can be made in polished steel, aluminiun non stick, copper and enamelled steel, but the one most widely used in Spain is the polished carbon steel pan. These are characterised by their red handles, which are coated with heat resistant paint. This means the pan can be used on the hob, burner or oven, making it the most versatile of the many paella pans available.

I have 3 paella pans – a small one which is mainly used for making tortillas (Spanish omelettes), a medium sized one one which holds a paella for 4 people, and a large, party-sized paella pan. The large one is also handy if I have several visitors, and want to poach or fry a large number of eggs at once.

Cazuelas

If you’ve ever been to a Spanish market, you’ll see lots of brown glazed terracotta dishes, from small, 4″ diameter ones, up to 12″ diameter. They also come in rectangular shapes, and they are cazuelas. Most Spanish kitchens will have a whole shelf of cazuelas in different shapes and sizes, because they are so versatile as to be almost indispensible.

Cazuelas are made from an ancient process which means the are stronger and thicker than most other types of pottery.

They are safe for use in the oven, on the hob and in the microwave, and you can pop them in the dishwasher after use. Cazuelas are good looking enough to use for table service, and because of their density, they will keep food hot for several minutes after removal from the heat source. Use for cooking and serving tapas, roast vegetables, baked fish, empanadas (Savoury pies) – almost anything can be cooked and served in a cazuela.

Plancha

A plancha is a cast iron hotplate, ridged one side and smooth on the other, for cooking meat or fish. The plancha is usually round, with handles at the side, so it can be taken straight from stove to table if you wish. Spanish ladies prefer to cook steaks and fish on a plancha because it seals the food very quickly, keeping the food moist and succulent. To test if your plancha is hot enough to cook on, drip some water on it. If the water droplets dance over the surface, the plancha is ready for action.

Pucheros

Pucheros are deep terracotta casserole dishes, made in the same way as cazuelas. Many Spanish recipes are based on peasant food, so stews and casseroles feature prominently in the Spanish diet. Pucheros are preferable to regular casserole dishes, as they prevent the liquid from evaporating during cooking. Many Spanish recipes feature chickpeas or beans, and if there is not enough moisture, they don’t swell to their full size.

Olive dishes

No tapas meal is complete without a dish of olives, and for the best presentation, an olive dish is a must. These are round, deep sided terracotta plates, with two integrated wells – a narrow one to hold cocktail sticks to spear the olives, and a wider one to hold olive stones.

 

Grater bowl

Many Spanish recipes call for grated tomato, and the easiest way to do this is to use a grater with an integrated bowl. Choose a grater bowl with a rasp (fine grater) to make it easier to make aioli (garlic Mayonnaise). Place the mayonnaise in the bowl and grate the garlic straight into it.

Garlic rasp

This is a fine grater on a handle, rather like a potato peeler, with a cover to catch the food, or you can buy small terracotta bowls with integrated ceramic rasps. Use for citrus zest, garlic, nutmeg and cinnamon – all of which figure prominently in Spanish recipes.

Olive oil jug or bottle

Olive oil goes into most Spanish food and, as if that wasn’t enough, the Spanish love to drizzle extra oil on bread, fish and salads. Jugs and bottles are available with specially shaped pouring lips so you don’t drown the food in oil.

Sangria jug

Spain means sangria, and it’s worth investing in a proper jug to serve your sangria in the Spanish way. The pouring lip is shaped so that the fruit and ice remains in the jug to keep it cool on the table. Sangria jugs come in various sizes, but it’s worth buying a big one, so you don’t have to keep making more. The longer the fruit sits in the sangria, the better the flavour.

Electric juicer

This is an optional extra, but as citrus juices figure in a lot of Spanish recipes, it’s a real time saver. I wouldn’t be without my juicer, as we enjoy freshly squeezed local orange juice every morning. What a great way to start the day!

With these basics, you’re ready to cook all things Spanish. Buen Provecho!

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